7 Skin Care Industry Lies That Salespeople Will Use to Trick You ...

There are so many skincare industry lies out there, which can make shopping for products even more daunting than it already is. When you hunt for skincare, you want items that will meet your specific needs without breaking the bank. However, because there are so many options on the market, many women don’t have all the knowledge they need to make good choices. I know I don’t! That makes it easier for salespeople to tell you skincare industry lies that you might fall prey to because you don’t know any better. Don’t feel bad because you are not alone. Here are some of the most common lies. Now that you know what they are, you can avoid being tricked into skincare that you don’t want or need.

1. Some Sun is OK

I know this goes against everything you hear, but one of the top skincare industry lies is that you need expensive and heavy duty sunscreen or you are doomed to getting skin cancer. Yes, unprotected sun exposure is a risk factor for skin cancer, but you don’t need a pricey sunscreen to do the job. Even the drugstore brand works for people with normal skincare. That being said, your body does rely on sunshine to produce vitamin D so a few minutes without sunscreen isn’t a death sentence. And it might actually be good for you. Talk to your doctor about the right amount for you.

2. Drugstore Brands Are Great

Much like I mentioned sunscreen above, the skincare industry wants you to think that the most expensive products are the best ones. That’s how they make their money. What they won’t tell you is that drugstore brands are often perfectly fine for most people’s skin. I can attest to that. I use drugstore body lotion and anti-wrinkle cream. Not only do I get the results I want, but I don’t have to spend a boatload of cash to get them.

3. Store Samples Aren’t That Sanitary

Yes, the staff at your favorite skincare product store will tell you that the community samples are perfectly safe, but that isn’t always the case. They are telling you this because the chance that you’ll buy something goes up if you get to try it for free first. It’s all psychological. The truth is that those samples are crawling with germs and bacteria. Even if people use their finger to try them, you don’t know where that finger has been. Choose your products based on science and fact rather than the high from getting something for free. Single serving samples though, are just fine!

4. You Can Return

Say you bought something you don’t like. No matter what you spent on it, you might think you’re out that cash. That’s simply not true. Many skincare companies and stores will take products back even if you’ve opened them. Call and ask yours. It’s money saved and you can get something you’ll like better.

5. Not All Salespeople Are Experts

Sure, many skincare salespeople really know their stuff, but most are simply hired to sell a product using proven tactics, without getting an education on what they are actually hawking. It’s best to get your skincare advice from your dermatologist so that when you go to buy products you aren’t tricked by someone who doesn’t know it all.

6. They PhotoShop

There are many reputable skincare companies out there are backed by science and facts. However, there are some to be wary of. Advertisements are often just as guilty as being touched up as anything else. After all, the companies want you to think that using their products will make you look as great as the person on their packaging. Use caution.

7. Little White Lies

No, not all skincare salespeople are going to lie to you, but they have been trained with special techniques to get you to keep listening to them. If someone asks you what products you use and tells you they aren’t good choices without knowing anything about your skin type, routine or skincare conditions, they probably aren’t the best person to be giving you advice on which products to buy.

Did you know that you might be getting tricked when shopping for skincare products? Me neither. I hope this helped you as much as it helped me.